School of Mechanical & Mining Engineering

Hypersonic aerodynamics has been a major research activity at The University of Queensland over the last 20 years. The researchers in this group have been active internationally and, during that period, have been involved in collaborative research programs with about 20 universities and research organisations around the world. The areas of expertise at the Centre for Hypersonics at UQ are as follows:

  • Development of hypervelocity test facilities
  • SCRAMjet propulsion (experiment, analysis and design)
  • Rocket flight testing
  • Aerothermodynamic experimentation and analysis
  • Advanced instrumentation for aerodynamic measurements
  • Computational fluid dynamic analysis of hypervelocity flows
  • Optical diagnostics for hypervelocity superorbital flows

The Centre for Hypersonics at UQ aims to maintain a high level of activity in both fundamental and applied research and provide graduate and undergraduate training opportunities of the highest international standards. In 2012 the Centre for Hypersonics graduated its 100th research higher degree student.


Associated Research Centre

Centre for Hypersonics, UQ

Staff

Professor Richard Morgan
(Director)


Professor David Mee

Professor Michael Smart (Professor of Air-Breathing Propulsion)

Dr Peter Jacobs (Senior Lecturer)

Dr Ingo Jahn (Lecturer)

Dr Tim McIntyre (Senior Lecturer)

Dr Anand Veeraragavan (Lecturer)

Dr Vincent Wheatley (Lecturer)

Contact Details

Please direct all enquiries here

Current Research

Hyshot

The HyShot Flight Program is an experiment designed to develop a correlation between pressure measurements made of supersonic combustion in The University of Queensland's T4 shock tunnel, and that which is observed in flight.

Compressible Flow CFD

The Compressible-Flow CFD group is an informal group of academic staff, postdoctoral fellows and postgraduate students. For many years, the main participants have been from the Centre for Hypersonics and the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence. Our common interest is the simulation of the flow of compressible fluids. In support of the experimental activities of the Centres, special emphasis is placed on simulations of transient flows relevant to shock tunnel and expansion tube experiments and on quasi-steady flows relevant to turbomachinery. Computation is used for both the design of the experimental facilities themselves, the estimation of test-flow conditions, and the supporting analysis of data obtained from project-oriented experiments such as the MUSES-C aeroshell.

Experimental Aerothermodynamics

Experiments are undertaken in sub-orbital and super-orbital hpervelocity flows in the Centre. The experimental work is done mostly in the shock tunnels and expansion tubes at UQ.